University of Pittsburgh
March 7, 2013

News of Note From Pitt

Contact:  412-624-4147
  • Business Professor Andrew T. Stephen Wins Award for Marketing Study of Ford’s Fiesta
  • Pitt’s Archive of European Integration, Largest Collection of EU Papers in Western Hemisphere, Marks 10 Years
  • National Science Foundation CAREER Grant Awarded to Physics Professor Sergey Frolov

PITTSBURGH—Behind the larger stories about the University of Pittsburgh are other stories of faculty, staff, and student achievement as well as information on Pitt programs reaching new levels of success. The following is a compilation of some of those stories. 

Business Professor Andrew T. Stephen Wins Award for Marketing Study of Ford’s Fiesta

Andrew T. Stephen, assistant professor of business administration and Katz Fellow in Marketing in the University of Pittsburgh’s Joseph M. Katz Graduate SchoolAndrew Stephen of Business and College of Business Administration, has been awarded a 2013 international ecch  Case Award in the category of marketing for his case study titled “FordFiesta Movement: Using Social Media and Viral Marketing to Launch Ford's Global Car in the United States.” The paper analyzed the Ford Motor Company campaign’s use of social media to market its new Fiesta automobile in the United States.

The annual ecch Case Awards are granted by ecch, formerly known as the European Case Clearing House, an independent international nonprofit educational organization founded in 1973 by the business-school community; ecch now has more than 800 member higher-education institutions and corporations worldwide. The largest single source of management case studies in the world, ecch has as its mission the promotion of the case method in management education by raising awareness and increasing usage of the method, as well as developing the skills of case teachers and authors.

Pitt’s Archive of European Integration, Largest Collection of EU Papers in Western Hemisphere, Marks 10 Years

Pitt’s Archive of European Integration—the largest collection of European Union documents in the Western Hemisphere—is marking the tenth anniversary of its founding. Launched in 2003 as a repository for privately produced research materials on the topic of European integration and unification, the archive has expanded to include the entire library of European Union documents from the Delegation of the Commission to the United States in Washington, D.C. The papers date back to the early 1950s, and 23,000 of the documents are fully searchable.

The archive is part of the Pitt University Library System’s D-Scribe Digital Publishing Program, which includes nearly 200,000 digital objects in more than 100 thematic digital collections. As an international leader in Open Access publishing, the Pitt University Library System makes these collections freely available to the global research community. Visit http://aei.pitt.edu to access the Archive of European Integration.

National Science Foundation CAREER Grant Awarded to Physics Professor Sergey Frolov

Sergey Frolov, assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy within the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, has been awarded a five-year, $550,000 CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The CAREER Program offers prestigious awards that support groundbreaking research bySergey Frolov junior faculty members who demonstrate great understanding of their fields. 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognized Frolov’s recent work in quantum physics with the 2012 Newcomb Cleveland Prize Award, an annual honor awarded to the author/s of the best research article/report appearing in the AAAS journal Science. In the paper, Frolov and his colleagues revealed the discovery of the Majorana fermion, a particle known for having quantum-computing capabilities.

With his NSF CAREER grant, Frolov will focus on demonstrating a new, third class of particles called “Majorana quasiparticles.” If these particles are interchanged, the universe transitions into a different state as dictated by the common laws of topology—the mathematical study of space. These particles can be created in nanoscale devices similar to transistors. This work could transform the fundamental laws governing the quantum world.

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